Windy days ahead!

 

 

Hello Everyone,

This is William with all American Doors, and like you I have been enjoying this unusually warm winter weather, however with the rain and winds lately, I have been receiving a lot of requests like this one:

******** ***** writes:

William I having issues with the door to my business. Yesterday a high wind came through, and the door has not closed properly since. Can you help?

During high winds, and storms door closer get broken, the top of the door and frame can easily be damaged, especially if the door closer is not heavy enough for the door. Also the hinges can go out of alignment, doors can warp, glass can shatter, and the doors can slam into people. It can lead to headaches for you, and greater expense for your business. A great to prepare for wind and rain is to have your doors inspected. A simple inspection is usually inexpensive, and the technician will be able to tell you if you need a new closer, pivots, or an adjustment.

I hope this helps.

If you have any other questions about anything I sell or service, please do not hesitate to call me 24 hours a day:

972-843-0293 Dallas 817-886-0625 Ft. Worth 903-265-9998 East Texas 832-726-0600 Houston 409-200 -2363 Galveston, email me at AADEastTX@gmail.com, or connect with me on facebook: http://fb.me/AADTX in the Door ( and Window) Business,

 

William

All American Doors.

 

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Winter Door and Window Issues

Good Evening Everyone,

William here with All American Doors. I apologize that my blog and other internet activities, as we fell into the busy season of the year. We have been busy with new door installations, and preparing our 2017 catalogs, and we all know how busy it gets over the holidays lol, however I am back and I promise regular updates. Don’t you just love the weather in Texas lately? With all of the rapid weather changes, we have been getting a lot of customers requesting door adjustments, because their doors are difficult to close, or will not remain closed: if this happens you may try a temporary fix on your own, but be forewarned, it will only be a temporary fix, and in the end you may cause more damage to the door, than if you had called out a professional to do the job. I know that DIY programs tell you to sand off the bottom of the door, but what happens when your home settles after the cold spell and you are left with a gap? I can not come over and fix this unless I shorten the size of your door frame from the top, which will require re-framing in the door, re-hinging the door, which is going to look rather silly, and everyone that enters your home is going to say “Oh wow your front door it short!” Even if we can, you now have another issue: the door handle (or knob) is going to be in a awkward place, so possibly re-doing that as well, which leaves the problem of how to deal with the holes for the old hardware. We maybe can over them with some kind of huge handle set back place, but chances are it is never going to look right, and the re-sealing from those holes is never going to be perfect, so basically you will spend less money buying a new door. Also sawing or sanding into the door may cause irreparable cracks. Another frequent complaint we have this time of year is that that cold air can be felt around the door, which is usually a weatherstripping problem. Professional installation of weatherstripping will end up saving you on your heating and air conditioning bills. I can not stress this enough. Last Summer I went to visit a, good friend of mine and noticed that he had air escaping through a French Door unit and after I replaced his weatherstripping, and threshold , he told me that the next month’s bill was more than $100.00 less in July than it was in June! A complete door and window inspection will take about an hour, and depending on the size of your home will run about $40-$100, and some companies offer to take the price of the inspection off of the contract, should you decide to make the repairs, it never hurts to ask.

The technician will also advise you about re-securing your windows and doors, which may prevent an easy break in.

If you have any other questions about anything I sell or service, please do not hesitate to call me 24 hours a day:

972-843-0293 Dallas 817-886-0625 Ft. Worth 903-265-9998 East Texas 832-726-0600 Houston 409-200 -2363 Galveston, email me at AADEastTX@gmail.com, or connect with me on facebook: http://fb.me/AADTX


As always I want to be your friend in the door and window business,

 

William

All American Doors.

8 Foot Door Question

Hello everyone William from All American Doors here,

I hope you all are enjoying your Summer. I am sorry it has been so long since my last update. June was an insane month for myself and my family, and I am just now getting my head above water. I have a lot of email to read through, but I found this question from a custom in the city of Allen,  Texas at the top, and as it is a question I do get asked a lot, I thought I would share it. 

***** ***** wrote:

Hello William,

I was wondering why I can not find the door I want in the size I need. We are building a new home, and the front entrance door will be 3foot 6 inches  wide by 8 foot tall.  Our ceilings are 12 foot. I really wanted a special look to the entrance of our home, but I am just not finding the door I want. I wanted a door with arched glass within the rectangle shaped door, and iron grille. I had my heart set on it, but,  it seems really hard to find, just the one I want and when I find a door company that will make it for me, the price is just way out of my budget. Why is that? Can you offer any alternatives that will give me a nice custom look for less than the $9,000 and up we have been quoted, which is way above my budget of $5,400, for buying the door. My contractor said he would install it to help save on the project, but even with that I still can not find what I want.

Many mill-work operations limit their selection of 8, 9 and 10 foot doors due to the cost of manufacturing, which limits the selection that your retail custom door company can offer to you. It costs more to produce an 8 foot door because the materials cost more: Obviously an 8 foot piece of wood is going to cost more than a 6 foot. The glass costs more, and glass manufactures will not produce every design they carry to fit larger doors. 8 foot doors are more labor intensive, as they weigh more, and require more space to work on, and more room to store.

The $9,000 price does not surprise me at all, and there are custom door shops that build to your specifications. These men and women are highly trained artisans, and they do not work cheap. Their work will cost you twice as much as a pre manufactured door, and sometimes even more. The more ornate the wood carving is, and the more glass, the price goes and it you want other options like an iron grille, or extra wood, or tinted, beveled or stained glass, it can go up to $10,000 or even more.

Also keep in mind something befall your home, like a water leak, or an act of God caused by the weather, the 3-6x 8-0 will be more difficult to replace, and you will be right back where you are now.

What I would recommend based on what you have told me about your doors and your ceiling size of 12 foot ceilings would be to get a standard 3-0 by 6-8, door, sidelights, and transom. This will open your entry way, provide sunlight, and that wow factor you are looking for, and be a little friendlier to your budget. In most cases: Your contractor, door installer or, a carpenter can easily widen the opening to accommodate sidelights and a transom before the brick is laid. If your front entrance is such that it can not be widened to accommodate sidelights: I still would suggest a 3-0 x 6-8 door and transom. I have attached some images for you look at.

I hope this helps.

If you have any other questions about anything I sell or service, please do not hesitate to call me 24 hours a day:

972-843-0293 Dallas 817-886-0625 Ft. Worth 903-265-9998 East Texas 832-726-0600 Houston 409-200 -2363 Galveston, email me at AllAmericanDoors@yahoo.com, or connect with me on facebook: www.facebook.com/AADTX. As always I want be your friend in the Door ( and Window) Business,

William

All American Doors

 

Window to Door Conversion Question

Good Morning everyone it is William from All American Doors,

I hope you all had a wonderful weekend. This weekend’s question comes from

a customer in Mesquite, Texas. For those of you who are not familiar with Mequite, it is in Dallas County and borders: Dallas, Garland, Balch Springs, Forney, and Rowlett.

**** **** wrote:

William, I have been reading your blog, and your Facebook.

I have a question an ugly picture window in my house. The glass is very thick, but is a single pane. The house was built in the 1950’s I am not sure when the window was put it, but it measures 5 feet wide and 6 feet tall. It is almost like a glass wall, and I hate it. Would it be expensive to change it out to a sliding glass or French Doors? My house is frame in the back where the window is, and there is an add on room, that is accessed from the kitchen door, on the other side. I do not really want to totally wall it in , because it would block out all of the light, but I do want to keep the wall, because the add on is very drafty.

While a professional would need to take on this project, and I can not give you an estimate with out actually looking at it, I can point you in the right direction. You have a few options, some being more expensive then others: ( Basically the more construction involved the more expensive it will become).

The first might be the least expensive option considering the width of the window is put in a 5×6’8 French door unit. These are available in wood, steel, vinyl, or a sliding glass door unit. This would involve adjusting the height of the opening, re-framing the entrance, but that is only really minor construction, that could be completed by a professional in one day. Another more expensive option would be to remove more of the wall and frame in a set of double doors, or a full 6 /0 x 6/8 French Door Unit. As you have mentioned you do not want to frame the wall in, you could also replace the picture window, with insulted glass windows, which you could raise , and lower at will, this would be a fairly time consuming and expensive project because the windows would need to be framed in. The choice is really up to you, and how you would like your interior wall to look. I hope this helps.

If you have any other questions about anything I sell or service, please do not hesitate to call me 24 hours a day:

972-843-0293 Dallas 817-886-0625 Ft. Worth 903-265-9998 East Texas 832-726-0600 Houston 409-200 -2363 Galveston, email me at AADEastTX@gmail.com, or connect with me on facebook: http://fb.me/AADTX in the Door ( and Window) Business,

Keyless Entry Lock

Hello everyone. It’s William from All American Doors.

I hope everyone had a great weekend, and I want to thank everyone who has been connecting with me on facebook, and via email with your questions. I do try to get to them all. This week’s question comes from a a customer in Houston, Texas:

***** ****** Writes:

Hi William,

I hope you can make a suggestion for my problem: every week one of my kids losses the  key to  our front door. It is getting so bad that last week my youngest two had to wait outside on the front porch until my oldest son came home from school at 4pm. Are there any options other than giving them another key?

In my opinion there is one very good option that should work well for your school age children:

a keyless entry. If they can remember a bike lock , or school locker combination they will be able to remember the combination. A keyless lock can be placed on almost any wood, steel, vinyl, or fiberglass door, so if you do not want to detract from the beauty of a front entry door, you can always put it  on the side door, or a rear entry door, like a French door. Keyless entry locks are offered by several reputable lock companies: Baldwin, Kwikset, and Schlage just to name a few,  the locks come in a variety of attractive hardware choices, and offer the convenience of being able to change the code as often as you need. I have attached a few pictures of some Baldwin key less entry locks, to provide you with an example. I hope this helps.

If you have any other questions about anything I sell or service, please do not hesitate to call me 24 hours a day:

972-843-0293 Dallas 817-886-0625 Ft. Worth 903-265-9998 East Texas 832-726-0600 Houston 409-200 -2363 Galveston, email me at AllAmericanDoors@yahoo.com, or connect with me on facebook: www.facebook.com/AADEastTX. As always I want be your friend in the Door ( and Window) Business,

William

All American Doors.

 

Custom Door or a Big Problem?

Hello everyone,

I have been working all this week and

weekend between rain storms.

I hope you all are safe and spending time with your family and friends.

Last week I took a break from blogging and answering customer questions,

so that you all could focus on the day, and your families. Well it is back to

work, and here we are.

This weeks I sorted through the questions I received, and thought this one might be interesting for you all to read about, as I actually have been in this situation before.

*** ** ****** wrote:

William,

My husband bought a door from an online facebook sale. It was half of a double door set with a rounded type top. He thought it would look different and give our home a unique look, I have attached a picture. The problem is we can not find anyone to install it for a reasonable price. Everyone we have talked to says that the wall will have to be cut out and the door frame will have to be custom built to meet the door. Our front entrance is brick, and it seems very expensive. What can you tell me? I have attached a picture of the door.

customers door half      ( This is the image that the customer sent me )

Hello, yes I can help you with this, and it is not actually an unusual problem. When half of a double door set gets destroyed for some reason, a home or business owner will try to recover some of the loss by selling the undamaged door. I will agree that because of the shape, It does it give a custom entrance look, however the problem is that because of that custom shape, a standard door frame will not fit it, and so a door frame must be altered to fit the opening. In addition to the custom carpentry required on the door frame, your door opening will very likely need to be altered to match the door frame. If the area around the door is wood with sheet rock walls, then trim removal, and going through the sheet rock will be costly, but no so much as if the area around the door that needs to be altered is brick, (as you have indicated). The the project will be fairly complicated and the brick will need to be replaced by a brick mason. This will run into thousands of dollars, and at least a couple of weeks, of coordinating schedules between your door installer, your carpenter, your brick mason, and your painter. (Some door installers will not do custom carpentry, or painting and trim work) I completed one of these projects very recently, and I can tell you that it in the end , with the costs involved, and the refinishing of the used door, the opening and replacement of the brick, and the re-rimming of the door, the project was very costly, time consuming, and in the end the customer has a used door with out a warranty! All because they wanted something that looked “custom”. In my experience, which my friends is over 30 years– my father was a master carpenter and home builder in Dallas, Texas, and I started learning from him, and working with him when I was very young, there are a lot of ways to get a “custom” door look without spending thousands of dollars of your hard earned money to get a used door installed. You can alter door size: go from standard to 8 foot, change to a double door configuration, have stained glass changed out for leaded glass, add custom wood, or I can do custom wood cut outs on panel, and solid wood doors in almost any shape you want! You can go with Radius top, oval glass, you can add iron grills and I can even send the door out to an engraver to have your name on it, if that is what you wish. My advice: send that door right back to facebook, and sell to someone else, because you do not need the trouble that thing is going to cause you.

 

I have attached a picture of my project to go along with the picture of the door the customer sent.

I hope this helps. If you have any other questions about anything I sell or service, please do not hesitate to call me 24 hours a day:

972-843-0293 Dallas 817-886-0625 Ft. Worth 903-265-9998 East Texas 832-726-0600 Houston 409-200 -2363 Galveston, email me at AllAmericanDoors@yahoo.com, or connect with me on facebook: www.facebook.com/AADEastTX. As always I want be your friend in the Door ( and Window) Business,

 

William

All American Doors.

Another Question About Hardwood vs Fiberglass.

Good Evening Everyone this is William with All American Doors. I hope everyone’s Sunday going well. As per the norm, I worked this weekend on a commercial door repair, and several residential door customers, including preparing a beautiful leaded glass double door unit, for installation next week. I have attached the catalog of the double door unit. Hopefully I can attach the finished installation next week! This week’s question comes from a customer in Corsicana,  Texas.

******* ************ Wrote:

Hello William,

I have been reading your blog, from your mobile site. I admit, it is very informative. Every week I wonder what your customers are going to ask you next: Will it be a door question? A window question, or do they have broken glass all over the place? It makes me laugh, Anyway what I was hoping you could tell what the difference is between a wood door , and a type of fiberglass door  I see at the big chain stores that look like wood? I have been looking at a door with a small rectangle glass, and iron grille at the top, I think the man called it a Speakeasy. It is very nice, and the man who works in the department told me it will last longer than wood? What can you tell me?

There are actually some very nice Fiberglass door products out there, however the ones you find in the chain stores, are not as they claim indistinguishable from hardwood, and there are certainly not the same quality. There are actually times when I will recommend a Therma-Tru door to a customer, as opposed to hardwood. For example: if the door is an area that is generally prone to a lot of moisture, like near a backyard pool. (Who does not love the look of beautiful French Doors that look out over a swimming pool?) Another example is a customer I have Galveston, who has a beach house. The constant salt sprays ruined the finish of the doors, so we installed a beautiful set of Therma-Tru full view doors. Constant moisture and humidity will cause hardwood door to swell, and will damage the finish of the door. A fiberglass door unit in this might be a better choice, as they will be lower maintenance in the long term. It is is not a replacement for a beautiful hardwood entrance door, and fiberglass can never truly capture the individuality of hardwoods, like knotty alder, mahogany, and walnut, but but a variety of options are available in quality fiberglass doors like Therma Tru, that can provide a custom entrance to be proud it.

My advice is: you are going to shop for fiberglass look for a well respected manufacturer: like Therma-tru, Plast Pro, and Provita. Understand some of the differences in hardwood, and fiberglass, and be an informed customer! One difference I have mentioned before, and I often tell customers with children who run in and out the door all day like mine do, is that if a fiberglass door becomes dented, there is very little I can do , but cry with you. With hardwood we have some options: depending on the extent of the damage, I may be able sand it out, and refinish it. I might even be able to remove the damaged area completely and add a glass panel, or another wood panel and trim it out, and maybe even an iron grille to prevent it from happening again. I have done this before with a lot of success. I know, some of you are saying “William you always preach to us about wood doors, and now you are recommending fiberglass? What is going on?” I never said fiberglass doors are evil, I just want my friends, customers and readers to be aware of the differences, and I feel bad when I get calls from people who have purchased fiberglass, under the belief that it will be just like wood.

I sell hardwood custom entrance doors, fiberglass, steel french doors, and as I much you hear me extol the virtues of hardwood, I even install sliding glass doors! The choice is really up to the taste of the customer, and how happy they are going to be with the product. Everyone has different tastes, for example in my family: my wife likes twin lite doors, my sister is trying to convince me to get her a set of deluxe double ¾ lite, 8 foot oval doors, my mother likes 15 lite French Doors painted with high gloss white paint, one of my daughters likes Speakeasy doors, and one of my nieces likes contemporary wood doors with dark walnut stain. Fortunately I have doors for them all, ( and I am sure they all have an installation schedule for me! Lol) I hope this has answered your questions I have attached some images of Therma-tru and hardwood entrance doors, so you can see the differences for yourself side by side. I have also attached a few images of Speakeasy doors, you can see a hardwood Speakeasy door. If you have any questions. You are always welcome to contact me 24 hours a day 972-843-0293 Dallas 817-886-0625 Ft. Worth 903-265-9998 East Texas 832-726-0600 Houston 409-200 -2363 Galveston, email

me at AllAmericanDoors@yahoo.com, or connect with me on facebook: www.facebook.com/AADEastTX. As always I want be your friend in the Door ( and Window) Business!

William,

All American Doors